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NZ calls for wider reform of resource management

A group of like-minded organisations, called Resource Reform NZ, is calling for a far-reaching review of the current resource management system.

The announcement made today by The National Party, to establish a review of the current urban planning system, recognises the current problem but does not go far enough.

The group is adamant that reform of the resource management system needs to go much further.

It recommends this is best addressed through cross-party consensus on the issue by a politically independent process, such as a Commission or similar.

Resource Reform NZ, is an alliance of EMA, Environmental Defence Society, Infrastructure New Zealand and Property Council New Zealand. The group is seeking prosperity for all New Zealanders through the development of an integrated governance, planning, funding and delivery system to guide resource management and national economic development.

“We know New Zealand’s prosperity is being held back by the current framework the wider planning system operates within. It is no longer fit for purpose, and is why we find ways to work around the current system when we want to deliver the infrastructure that the county so desperately needs,” says Stephen Selwood, Chief Executive, Infrastructure New Zealand.

“The current uncoordinated planning system is driving increasing housing unaffordability, the high cost of commercial development and reliance on outdated funding mechanisms such as rates and council debt. That means we’re simply not building enough, quickly enough with the quality and innovation needed to develop the cities and standard of living we all expect in the future,” says Connal Townsend, Chief Executive, Property Council New Zealand.

“The environment is suffering too. The Resource Management Act is our pre-eminent environmental law. Yet the cumulative effects of permitted land use activities over the lifetime of the Act have led to a slow but significant deterioration of the quality of our streams, rivers and lakes,” says Gary Taylor, Executive Director, Environmental Defence Society.

“For business these issues are also stifling the ability to grow and expand. Which in turn, also impacts employees and the families. Looking into the future, we face even bigger challenges in how we manage and respond to demographic changes, advances in technology, rising consumer expectations and climate change,” says Kim Campbell, CEO, EMA.

Source: EMA

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